Focusing was developed by Eugene Gendlin starting in the 1950s.  Gendlin was interested in why some psychotherapy patients got better, whilst others did not make much progress.  It turned out that it had a lot more to do with the client than with the therapist. The clients who got better where the ones who, naturally and on their own,  went through a process of going quiet and still inside, and listening to their inner feelings in the body.  Gendlin went on to create a method, which he named focusing, that helps anyone to access their own felt sense.  

Focusing can be used in a wide variety of applications – and is a discipline that is constantly evolving. Focusing is being used with business clients to help people over come action blocks, and to help entrepreneurs and other gets clear on their vision and goals. It can be used to tackle phobias such as fear of flying or claustrophobia.  It is a great tool to help you in handling challenging relationships – it will  bring you  closer to the people who  are important to you whilst also helping you to cope with people you find difficult, whether in the office or in your personal life.

The focusing method is constantly evolving, and when Alexander technique teacher, Kevin McEvenue, discovered focusing he integrated the two methods and created Whole Body Focusing, as he found that the two methods supported and enhanced each other. Later, and working together with Karen Whalen, they discovered the importance of the relationship betwe and a new strand of focusing – Relational Wholebody Focusing was born.  More information is here

Today focusing is used in diverse situations, including  in professional contexts, helping entrepreneurs and business leaders clarify vision and goals, supporting professionals overcome action blocks and for all of us helping us find greater self acceptance and self- compassion for ourselves and those around us.  Using Relational Whole Body Focusing is an exciting field that helps us access to the collective intelligence.